Three Core Concepts in Early Development, by the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University

October 18, 2012

Thank you to the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child and the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University for developing this outstanding three-part video series, which depicts how advances in neuroscience, molecular biology, and genomics now give us a much better understanding of how early experiences are built into our bodies and brains, for better or for worse.

Healthy development in the early years provides the building blocks for educational achievement, economic productivity, responsible citizenship, lifelong health, strong communities, and successful parenting of the next generation. 

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1. Experiences Build Brain Architecture
(by the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University)

“The basic architecture of the brain is constructed through a process that begins early in life and continues into adulthood.”

2. Serve & Return Interaction Shapes Brain Circuitry
(by the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University)

“One of the most essential experiences in shaping the architecture of the developing brain is “serve and return” interaction between children and significant adults in their lives.”

3. Toxic Stress Derails Healthy Development
(by the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University)

“Without caring adults to buffer children, the unrelenting stress caused by extreme poverty, neglect, abuse, or severe maternal depression can weaken the architecture of the developing brain, with long-term consequences for learning, behavior, and both physical and mental health.”

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How ChildCareGroup Addresses these Early Development Needs:

Our early care and school readiness education programs at ChildCareGroup emphasize the importance of early learning. CCG classrooms operate at a lower teacher/student ratio to ensure that each child gets adequate interaction time. While in our classrooms, children remain with a constant caregiver up to three years, to develop a healthy relationship between the child, caregiver and parent. Volunteers also assist with cognitive and socialization skills, by reading to children and helping with educational activities in the classroom.

In addition, we work with parents to become highly involved partners in their child’s education. Our early literacy programs encourage parents to read with their children at home and assist their children with science projects and other early learning opportunities to develop their growing brains.